Identity, Fondness, and Unity Given Decreasing Similarity


As the physical, emotional, and cultural differences among people making up a society (or a group of any size) become greater, this has an effect upon the degree to which the individuals in that society identify with, feel a commonality with, feel a fondness for, and have a commitment to -

  • The society as a whole and
  • To the other individuals in that society.

Given a society populated by group A, what will be the general results of the relocation of individuals to that society from groups B, C, D, etc., who differ from individuals of group A and from one another?

Feelings About the Society As a Whole

The increasing numbers of individuals of groups B, C, D, etc. in the society and the increasing physical, emotional, cultural differences of those in the society have certain effects upon how those of group A feel about the society as a whole, as noted below.

  • As the proportion of persons from groups B, C, D, etc. in the society increases, the degree of identity with that society as a whole on the part of the those of group A decreases.
  • As identity that persons of group A have with that society as a whole decreases, the affection that these individuals feel toward that society decreases.
  • As the affection that individuals of group A feel for the society as a whole decreases, their concern for the welfare of the society as a whole decreases.
  • As identity with, connectedness to, and fondness for the society decreases, the happiness of those of group A decreases.

The increasing numbers of individuals of groups B, C, D, etc. in the society and the increasing physical, emotional, cultural differences of those in the society have certain effects upon how those of groups B, C, D, etc. feel about the society as a whole.

  • As the differences among those in the society increase, the degree of identity with that society as a whole on the part of individuals of groups B, C, D, etc. living there decreases - or, for the newer immigrants, is precluded.
  • As identity with that society as a whole decreases - or given that no identity with the society developed - the affection that persons of groups B, C, D, etc. feel toward that society decreases or is precluded.
  • As the affection that individuals of groups B, C, D, etc. feel for the society as a whole decreases - or given no affection for the society in the first place - the concern of those of groups B, C, D, etc. for the welfare of the society as a whole decreases or is precluded.
  • As identity with, fondness for, and connectedness to the society decreases - or, for the newer immigrants, does not develop - the happiness of persons of groups B, C, D, etc. decreases or is precluded.

Feelings About Other Individuals in the Society

The increasing numbers of individuals of groups B, C, D, etc. in the society and the increasing physical, emotional, cultural differences of those in the society have certain effects upon how those of group A feel about other individuals in the society, as noted below.

  • Individuals of group A have less identity with those of groups B, C, D, etc. than they do with others of group A.
  • Because individuals of group A identify less with persons of groups B, C, D, etc. - the latter constituting an increasing portion of the population of the society - than they do with others of group A, they feel less affection for the persons of group B, C, D, etc. than they do for others of group A. Also they receive less affection from those of groups B, C, D, etc. than they do from others of group A.
  • As the affection that individuals of group A feel for and receive from those of groups B, C, D, etc., who make up an increasing proportion of others in the society, decreases, the less concern do individuals of group A feel for the welfare of others in the society.
  • Since those of group A feel less identity with and feel less affection for and receive less affection from others in the society, they are less happy.

The increasing numbers of individuals of groups B, C, D, etc. in the society and the increasing physical, emotional, cultural differences of those in the society have certain effects upon how those of groups B, C, D, etc. feel about other individuals in the society.

  • Persons of groups B, C, D, etc. have decreasing identity with others in the society - or, in the case of many immigrants, develop no identity with most others in the society.
  • Because individuals of groups B, C, D, etc. identify less and less with the others in the society, they feel less and less affection for these. Too, as differences among those in the society increase, they receive less and less affection from these others; and the newer immigrants, might receive little or none.
  • As the affection that those of groups B, C, D, etc. feel for or receive from others in the society decreases - or if any such fondness is not a factor at all - then these persons feel less, or no, concern for the welfare of others in the society.
  • Since those of groups B, C, D, etc. feel less identity with and feel less affection for and receive less affection from others in the society (or little, if any, of these in the first place), they are less happy.

Increasing physical, emotional, and cultural differences among those in a society lead to decreasing identity, fondness, happiness, and social unity.

10/03


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